New Technique: Innovative Pain Device Relieves Chronic Pain Without Drugs

We continue to see more and more articles and message board posts about Calmare Therapy.  Here’s the most recent one we found (below).

Please comment at the end of the article if you have tried this therapy or have any information on it.  On the surface it looks extremely promising and we’d like to gather more information for the RSDS/CRPS community on it.

Innovative Pain Device Relieves Chronic Pain Without Drugs

by ELIZABETH MAGILL on MARCH 21, 2012

The Calmare scrambler was invented by Giuseppe Marineo, an Italian scientist. “Calmare” means “to ease” or “to soothe” in Italian.

One of the greatest frustrations of patients and healthcare providers alike is dealing with pain, particularly chronic pain. And nowhere is this more apparent than for cancer patients who endured months or years of chemotherapy, and are left with peripheral neuropathy, a chronic pain condition.

Patients who have agonized through chronic pain say an emerging new treatment has improved their lives – without the use of painkilling drugs. “It’s just a miracle”, Michelle Jacobson, a breast cancer survivor, told a Rhode Island television station.

This non-invasive chronic pain solution is called the Calmare Pain Therapy Treatment, which is licensed to Competitive Technologies, Inc. (OTCQX:CTTC.PK ). Calmare uses a biophysical “scrambler” device which transmits low doses of electricity through electrodes on the skin in order to block pain. In essence, the Calmare scrambler “tricks” the brain into thinking there isn’t pain.

Researcher, bioengineer, professor, and founder of the Delta Research & Development center in Rome, Giuseppe Marineo developed the Calmare scrambler. The device was named after the Italian word “calmare”, which means “to ease” or “to soothe”.

The Calmare scrambler is most often used for chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy, which causes sensations of burning, numbness, aching, coldness, itching, and tingling. However, Calmare is also being used to treat other chronic pain conditions, including lower back pain, neck pain, diabetic pain, fibromyalgia, post-surgical pain, RSD (Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy), and radiating pain.

The Calmare device was approved by the Food and Drug Administration in 2009, but is only available at 16 private pain clinics in the United States, mostly on the east coast. Wounded soldiers and veterans are also receiving Calmare Pain Therapy at the Walter Reed Army Medical Center and nearly a dozen other U.S. military facilities. The Department of Defense is seeking alternative forms of pain management to discourage the overuse of painkillers, which are widely used by injured veteransreturning from Iraq and Afghanistan.

Medical professionals and clinical studies are reporting promising results from Calmare’s drug-free device.

In a clinical study at the University of Wisconsin, researchers found that Calmare scrambler therapy showed measurable results in helping patients with Chemotherapy Induced Pain Neuropathy. “This technology has consistently shown very impressive results in our blind study,” reports Toby Campbell, MD, chief of Palliative Medicine, University of Wisconsin. 

In a pilot trial of the Calmare device, Massey Cancer Center in Richmond, Virginia found a dramatic reduction in CIPN pain with no toxicity side effect. The 2010 study was published in the Journal of Pain and Symptom Management.

The Mayo Clinic is also requesting volunteers in a clinical trial using Calmare scrambler technology to analyze pain associated with post-herpetic neuralgia.

Click here for the original article online.
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